All posts by Drew M. Capuder

Publisher of Drew Capuder's Employment Law Blog. Lawyer with more than 29 years experience, focusing on employment law, commercial litigation, and mediation. Extensive trial and appellate experience in state and federal courts. Call Drew at 304-333-5261

Rex Tillerson’s First Speech at the State Department: Lessons for Employers

Lessons for Employers

The U.S. State Department has about 70,000 employees. Rex Tillerson was confirmed as President Trump's pick for Secretary of State, and yesterday was his first day on the job.

So Tillerson spoke yesterday to hundreds of State Department employees to introduce himself and talk about their shared mission.

I was impressed by the speech, and I thought the speech could give a lot of guidance to management about the message that companies and government agencies should communicate to their employees.

Here are my thoughts on what Secretary Tillerson said that should be viewed as exemplary:

  1. Tillerson expressed humility. He was Chief Executive Officer of ExxonMobil, one of the largest corporations in the world (which probably has even more employees than the State Department), but he described himself as "the new guy" that needed the help of the employees.
  2. Instead of bragging about his decades of executive experience in the oil & gas business, he charmingly recounted his wife's message that his career at ExxonMobil was a "41 year training program" for his new job at the State Department.
  3. He showed respect to his new employees. He stressed their extraordinary collective experience and expertise. He noted that the employees had an average 11 years at the State Department, and he said he had been there for 45 minutes.
  4. He stressed cores principles such as that all employees would be treated with respect.
  5. He focused on the shared missions, including keeping employees safe and advancing the interests of the United States.
  6. He stressed accountability and a need to question old ways of doing things to look for ways to better accomplish the missions.
  7. One of the overarching messages was respect, both in recognizing the expertise of the employees and stressing the need to treat employees with respect.
  8. It would be hard to find a better message, coming out of a fantastically hostile election, to try to rally employees around a shared mission.

So employers should watch the speech for the principles it reflects.

Rex Tillerson's Speech at State Department

Here is a link Tillerson's speech from the State Department's YouTube channel, and you can watch the speech in the embedded video window below:

Drew Capuder Will Be Speaking at Sterling Employment Law Seminar

On March 29, 2017, I will be speaking and presenting an article on “The Perilous Intersection of FMLA and ADA,” at a seminar hosted by Sterling Education Services. The Seminar, “Employment Law: Rights, Benefits, and Emerging Issues,” will take place in Morgantown, West Virginia. If you would like to attend the seminar click here for more information and a registration form.

Here is the agenda for my speech and article:

  1. FMLA updates
  2. ADA updates and EEOC guidelines
    1. Expansion of what can be considered a “disability”
    2. What constitutes “reasonable accommodation” according to the EEOC
    3. Discrimination and violations
    4. Review and update written policies and job descriptions
  3. Overlap of FMLA and ADA: finding the right balance

Favorite quotes about the law, part 1

Maybe it’s the frustrated novelist in me, but I’ve been thinking about literature and law.

This article is the start of a series where, once in a while and for no particular reason, I will focus on thought provoking and even profound statements (by others) about the law. Sometimes the quotations will be from literature, and sometimes they will be from legal writings, philosophical works, and from darn near anything else that makes us think about the nature of law and its relationship to society.

So let’s begin . . . Continue reading Favorite quotes about the law, part 1

Fifth Circuit applies hostile work environment to age claims

Courts have sometimes questioned whether hostile work environment claims apply to all “flavors” of discrimination. Hostile work environment claims most frequently arise in claims of sex discrimination  and race discrimination claims under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but age discrimination claims under federal law arise under a different statute, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.

The Fifth Circuit directly held recently that hostile work environment claims are encompassed by age discrimination claims under the ADEA in Dediol v. Best Chevrolet, Inc., — F.3d — (5th Cir. September 12, 2011).

Continue reading Fifth Circuit applies hostile work environment to age claims

US Supreme Court Rules for Employee on "Cat’s Paw" Theory

The United States Supreme Court recently unanimously issued a major victory for employees under “USERRA“, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994, 38 U.S.C. § 4301 et seq., on the “cat’s paw” theory in employment discrimination claims. The decision was in Staub v. Proctor Hospital, — U.S. — (March 1, 2011) (opinion at Google Scholar). Justice Scalia wrote the opinion for the unanimous court. Justice Alito wrote an opinion concurring in the judgment, which Justice Thomas joined. Justice Kagan did not participate in the decision.

What is the “Cat’s Paw” Scenario?

Drew's kitty-cat, HannaSo, what the heck is the “cat’s paw” theory? Does it explain why my cat, pictured at the left, is staring so intently at you?

First, to define “cat’s paw” in a non-legal context, the Webster’s Online dictionary defines a “cat’s paw” as: “A person used by another to gain an end.” The term arises out of a fable in which a a shrewd monkey tricks a cat into pulling roasting chestnuts out of a fire—the cat gets its paw burned, and the monkey gets the chestnuts and scampers away unhurt.

Continue reading US Supreme Court Rules for Employee on “Cat’s Paw” Theory

Legislative Update: Pending bill would expand sick leave rights for West Virginia employees

House Bill 2770, which was recently introduced into the West Virginia House of Delegates, would create the “Flexible Leave Act” to allow employees to take already earned paid leave, and to use that leave for paid time off for an illness of the employee or the employee’s “immediate family”. The bill does not give employees any additional paid leave—it only allows them to take their paid leave that they have already earned under their employers’ policies, and allows the flexibility (hence the name, “Flexible Leave Act”) to take leave that may have been intended for another purpose, such as earned vacation time, and apply it for the different purpose of their own or an immediate family member’s illness.

On January 24, 2011, Delegates Caputo, Fragale, Hatfield, Martin, and Moye introduced House Bill 2770, which is being referred to the Committee on Energy, Industry and Labor, Economic Development and Small Business then Finance. You can keep track of the progress of the bill by going to the Bill Status page and entering 2770 in the “Enter Bill Number” field. For information on the bill’s sponsors, or on any other members of the Senate, you can go to the House Members page and pick the member from a drop-down list. For those of you who are interested in finding out more about the legislative process, the Legislature has a “How a Bill Becomes Law” page.  The Legislature also has a very nice photo gallery of the Capitol Building.

Continue reading Legislative Update: Pending bill would expand sick leave rights for West Virginia employees

Legislative Update: West Virginia legislature may give employers more time to cut final paycheck

Pending West Virginia legislation would, if passed, extend the time employers have to issue a terminated employee’s final paycheck, from the current 72 hours after discharge to the next regular pay day.

On January 28, 2011, Senators Palumbo and Klempa introduced Senate Bill 339, which is being referred to the Labor and Finance Committees. You can keep track of the progress of the bill by going to the Bill Status page and entering 339 in the “Enter Bill Number” field. For information on the bill’s sponsors, or on any other members of the Senate, you can go to the Senate Members page and pick the member from a drop-down list.

Senate Bill 339 would amend the WV Wage Payment and Collection Act, which deals in part with the obligation of an employer to issue a final paycheck to an employee within a certain period of time.  The Wage Payment and Collection Act currently sets two different deadlines, depending on whether the employee resigned or was discharged.

  • Section 21-5-4(b): If an employee is discharged, the employer must pay the employee all earned wages within 72 hours after the discharge.
  • Section 21-5-4(c): if the employee resigns, the employer must pat the employee all earned wages by the next regular payday, either through “regular channels” or, if the employee requests, by mail. There is this additional variation where the employee resigns: if the employee provides “at least one pay period’s notice of intention to quit”, then the employer must pay the employee all earned wages “at the time of quitting” (which is the final day worked after giving notice).

Continue reading Legislative Update: West Virginia legislature may give employers more time to cut final paycheck

Legislative Update: Insurance industry seeks amendment to West Virginia Human Rights Act

Insurance companies have been urging the West Virginia Legislature to pass legislation to overturn the West Virginia Supreme Court’s decision in Michael v. Appalachian Heating, LLC, 701 S.E.2d 116 (June 11, 2010). In Michael, the West Virginia Supreme Court held that the West Virginia Human Rights Act prohibited discrimination by an insurance company in settling claims covered by an insurance policy.

The Michael Decision

Generally, the Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination (1) in the workplace, (2) in places of public accommodation (like hotels, shopping centers), and (3) in connection with transactions involving housing and real estate (like renting apartments and buying houses).

But at issue in Michael was section 5-11-9(7) of the Human Rights Act, which was not limited to those three categories of activity. Here is the relevant language in section 5-11-9(7)(A);

It shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice [based on race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, age, and disability] . . .

(7) For any person, employer, employment agency, labor organization, owner, real estate broker, real estate salesman or financial institution to:

(A) Engage in [1] any form of threats or reprisal, or to [2] engage in, or hire, or conspire with others to commit acts or activities of any nature, the purpose of which is to harass, degrade, embarrass or cause physical harm or economic loss or [3] to aid, abet, incite, compel or coerce any person to engage in any of the unlawful discriminatory practices defined in this section . . . .

In subpart (7)(A) above I have bracketed the three specific causes of action (legal theories) which the Supreme Court said are discernible in subpart (7)(A). I have also bolded the second cause of action, which was the key cause of action at issue in the Michael case.

Continue reading Legislative Update: Insurance industry seeks amendment to West Virginia Human Rights Act